Iron Bonehead artist- Vesicant interview is up









1. How did Vesicant come to be? Is the outcome what you thought all a long?


C:


N.H of Heresiarch and myself started Vesicant in 2013 with two others when I moved to Wellington; rehearsing our earliest material in a dank, shitty basement of a tip in Te Aro (I think the house has been demolished now). I had a vision for the band to go a lot further than just another skirting project lost to the ages, and immediately set to writing the music.


Mordance joined on drums for a local show in April 2015; being from Brisbane (Australia) we had little time to rehearse, so it was a trial by fire of which he nailed completely. Later I left Heresiarch to focus on Vesicant, and N.H left Vesicant for the same reason. We realised we had similar but varying visions for our craft. From that point Mordance and I had an idea of what we wanted to achieve, and we set out to do it.


2. Vesicant to me is a mix of  Dark metal, Post Black metal and Crusty Doom. Very similar to was Disembowelment and Alchemist were doing in Australia . Are you fans of either?


C:


Axis of Advance, Sacramentary Abolishment and Order From Chaos set the standard for me a long time ago. Thergothon, Sinistrous Diabolus and early Worship for doom...


3. The black metal I hear in you is more Post Black metal bands like  DHG, Father Befouled , Early Code, Dolorian and even you label mates Weregoat . Were did all the experimentation in sounds come from?


C:


Naturally people are going to make comparisons in an attempt to better familiarize themselves with our music, but honestly I haven't heard any of those bands. Hate Forest being the only black metal I've listened to in many years. Generally I listen to a lot music outside of metal; allowing too much of a closely-related style to penetrate the psyche can quickly affect/dilute your creative reservoir. Once the tools are acquired, an artist should seek to distance themselves almost entirely from what others are doing, not out of ignorance but in order to maintain and build ones own vision and style. This is the most obvious path to mastery that I can see.


Creative processes have always fascinated me. The 'experimentation' is the result of patience, attention to detail and knowing when a section of music is complete and when its time to move on. The power a section of music has is only as strong as it's contrast to the rest of the piece - dynamics in mood, shape and style are essential; as is the subject matter to which it fits.


4. You signed with Iron Bonehead after just one demo. Is that how they found out about you?  Are you pleased with the outcome to this point ?


C:


At the time a rough version of Blood Miller was sent to Pat without vocals, understandably it wasn't enough. After struggling to get something going with other labels I sent a more polished version again and he came back to us immediately with a deal completely laid out. Thus the warmachine has surged forward and the release materialised. He's a man of his word, and the rest is history.


5. Shadows of cleaning iron is your 1st proper album . Is there a theme or story within the tracks?


J:


The themes of the album are by content set around certain elements of the Great War, and by subtext around the parallels of a deeper nightmare world, the ideas of horror beneath us, around us, within us. There are also themes of struggle and triumph, pain and will, the drive to survive and to kill at any cost. The lyrics should speak for themselves.


6.  How does the live show differ from the album and is it hard to get the power of the live show produced on the LP?


J:


A live show and an album are naturally far different beasts. Writing/rehearsing/recording/mixing an album is an act of extended and fixated attrition: piece by piece, layer by layer, where the developing form in part dictates itself to the creator, i.e. there is a mathematic angle (the skills and knowledge) and an artistic angle (the fuel and fire) which merge through focus and will. To contrast this, a live set is done on the edge of your limbs - all in/all out. The album is the blueprint for the assault, the live set is the assault.


7. What bands are impressing the members of Vesicant currently?


No comment.


8. How has the digital age changed music creation, promotion and making music a career for underground artists in your eyes ?


C:


Accessibility has been streamlined at the cost of authenticity.


9. If you could make a proper video for any track on Shadows of cleaning iron which would it be and what would you like it to represent?


C:


What a strange question... music videos, particularly in metal are a terrible idea as they tend to undermine the music and distort the listeners personal visual interpretation. Our music is best enjoyed in the dark, eyes closed for maximum exposure. With that said if you and some pals put your hands up to be burned alive, torn to shreds by shrapnel or breathe deadly gasses for a Vesicant music video, we're all ears.


10. Let just say a big label like Nuclear blast or Century media came to Vesicant with a offer is that something you would want or are more indie underground labels like Iron Bonehead the way to success for bands that are extreme?


C:


I'd rather work with someone who genuinely appreciates the project and has the reach and vision to get it into the hands of those who matter.


11. I hear you like the term War Metal for your music how does that represent the music of Vesicant to the band?


C:


An artist who blends various styles in order to more accurately bring to life their vision or narrative will receive a more ambiguous title; I think War Metal is one of those titles. We write blackened death & doom metal... with our primary theme being conflict, death and suffering on a massive scale - if the shoe fits.


12.How does Edict differ from the new album?


C:


Edict more accurately represents what the band was during its initial inception. The hate was strong, undiminished, but also lacked focus or clarity - hence it being savage and unchained. Those elements have carried over into the album but with a heightened attention paid to detail, tone and harmony. Conceptually it hasn't differed, however... I've always had a strong interest in War History.


13. Will you be touring outside of New Zealand at all with new album?


C:


Vesicant doesn't have a full line up at present being only Mordance and myself. Until this changes, I'll continue to focus on writing new material.


14. Do the members of Vesicant have other projects or like to support some local or friends projects that really deserve more respect?


No comment.


15. Thank you for the time  any closing thought here.



You're welcome.
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